Real Reason why Saraki, Ekweremadu are after Me – Senator Adamu


A former governor of Nassarawa state and senator representing Nasarawa west, Abdullahi Adamu has opened up on his problems with the leadership of the Senate.

Adamu landed in hot water last week after the chamber mandated its Ethics, privileges and public petitions committee to investigate him and some other un-named individuals allegedly plotted to destabilize the senate in a phone conversation.

In response to the development, Adamu, in a statement to newsmen, said that his only “crime that is considered heinous by the leadership of the Senate” was his caution to fellow senators, to respect the person and office of President Muhammadu Buhari.

“I stood up on the floor of the Senate, in a raucous plenary, to caution against increasing show of disrespect to the person and the office of the president of the Federal Republic. I feared that this was becoming a pattern. I thought this was against the culture of the Legislature and we needed to pull back in order to maintain mutual respect between the Executive and the legislature.

“The National Assembly is the second arm of this administration.”

“We cannot undermine the executive without undermining the government of which we are apart. I did not think this was a crime but, it turned out I was wrong.

“To show their displeasure with my stand, my colleagues acted in a manner to impugn my integrity.

First, there was the tendentious story put out in a press statement from the Senate, to the effect that I had been unceremoniously removed as chairman of the Northern Senators Forum and that senator (Magatarkada)Wamakko had replaced me.

“I did not bother to respond to the concocted lies because the Forum has a system of changing its leadership. Its affairs are not conducted in press statements emanating from strange and unauthorised persons,” he further stated.

“Part of my crime is my stand on the amendment of the Electoral Act.

“In that controversial amendment, Senate sought to change the order of elections decided by the electoral umpire, the Independent National Electoral Commission, for the 2019 general elections.

“I and some of my colleagues were opposed to this amendment on the grounds that it is not the duty of the Senate to determine the order of elections.

“It had never been part of the Electoral Act and there was no need to deny the commission the right to do its duty, as it deemed fit.”

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